Configuration Examples

This section provides examples for a wide range of logging scenarios. While not exhaustive of all possibilities (Traffic Server logging is quite flexible), these entries should hopefully get most administrators headed onto the right path.

Unless otherwise noted, the example configurations here are to be applied in logging.yaml.

Online Event Log Builder

If you need any assistance building your event log, you can try out our online log builder. This is a work in progress, so any comments, critique or suggestions are most welcome.

Emulating Other HTTP Server Formats

Netscape Common

The following figure shows a sample log entry in a Netscape Common log file.

Sample Netscape Common log entry

The numbered sections correspond to the following log fields in Traffic Server:

No. Field Description
1 chi The IP address of the client’s host machine.
2 This hyphen (-) is always present in Netscape log entries.
3 caun The authenticated client username. A hyphen (-) means no authentication was required.
4 cqtn The date and time of the client request, enclosed in brackets.
5 cqtx The request line, enclosed in quotes.
6 pssc The proxy response status code (HTTP reply code).
7 pscl The length of the Traffic Server response to the client in bytes.

To recreate this as a log format in logging.yaml you would define the following format object:

formats:
- name: common
  format: '%<chi> - %<caun> [%<cqtn>] "%<cqtx>" %<pssc> %<pscl>'

Netscape Extended

The following figure shows a sample log entry in a Netscape Extended log file.

Sample Netscape Extended log entry

In addition to fields 1-7 from the Netscape Common log format, the Extended format adds the following fields:

No. Field Description
8 sssc The origin server response status code.
9 sshl The server response transfer length; the body length in the origin server response to Traffic Server, in bytes.
10 cqcl The client request transfer length; the body length in the client request to Traffic Server, in bytes.
11 pqcl The proxy request transfer length; the body length in the Traffic Server request to the origin server.
12 cqhl The client request header length; the header length in the client request to Traffic Server.
13 pshl The proxy response header length; the header length in the Traffic Server response to the client.
14 pqhl The proxy request header length; the header length in Traffic Server request to the origin server.
15 sshl The server response header length; the header length in the origin server response to Traffic Server.
16 tts The time Traffic Server spent processing the client request; the number of seconds between the time that the client established the connection with Traffic Server and the time that Traffic Server sent the last byte of the response back to the client.

To recreate this as a log format in logging.yaml you would define the following format object:

formats:
- name: extended
  format: '%<chi> - %<caun> [%<cqtn>] "%<cqtx>" %<pssc> %<pscl> %<sssc> %<sscl> %<cqcl> %<pqcl> %<cqhl> %<pshl> %<pqhl> %<sshl> %<tts>'

Netscape Extended-2

The following figure shows a sample log entry in a Netscape Extended2 log file.

Sample Netscape Extended-2 log entry

In addition to fields 1-16 from the Netscape Common and Netscape Extended log formats above, the Extended-2 format adds the following fields:

No. Field Description
17 phr The proxy hierarchy route; the route Traffic Server used to retrieve the object.
18 cfsc The client finish status code: FIN if the client request completed successfully or INTR if the client request was interrupted.
19 pfsc The proxy finish status code: FIN if the Traffic Server request to the origin server completed successfully or INTR if the request was interrupted.
20 crc The cache result code; how the Traffic Server cache responded to the request: HIT, MISS, and so on. Cache result codes are listed in Cache Result Codes.

To recreate this as a log format in logging.yaml you would define the following format object:

formats:
- name: extended2
  format: '%<chi> - %<caun> [%<cqtn>] "%<cqtx>" %<pssc> %<pscl> %<sssc> %<sscl> %<cqcl> %<pqcl> %<cqhl> %<pshl> %<pqhl> %<sshl> %<tts> %<phr> %<cfsc> %<pfsc> %<crc>'

Squid

The following figure shows a sample log entry in a Squid log file.

Sample Squid log entry

The numbered sections correspond to the following log fields in Traffic Server:

No. Field Description
1 cqtq The client request timestamp in Squid format. The time of the client request in seconds since January 1, 1970 UTC (with millisecond resolution).
2 ttms The time Traffic Server spent processing the client request. The number of milliseconds between the time the client established the connection with Traffic Server and the time Traffic Server sent the last byte of the response back to the client.
3 chi The IP address of the client’s host machine.
4 crc/pssc The cache result code; how the cache responded to the request: HIT, MISS, and so on. Cache result codes are described in Logging Cache Results. The proxy response status code (HTTP response status code from Traffic Server to client).
5 psql The length of the Traffic Server response to the client in bytes, including headers and content.
6 cqhm The client request method: GET, POST, and so on.
7 cauc The client request canonical URL; blanks and other characters that might not be parsed by log analysis tools are replaced by escape sequences. The escape sequence is a percentage sign followed by the ASCII code number of the replaced character in hex.
8 caun The username of the authenticated client. A hyphen (-) means that no authentication was required.
9 phr/shn The proxy hierarchy route. The route Traffic Server used to retrieve the object.
10 psct The proxy response content type. The object content type taken from the Traffic Server response header.

To recreate this as a log format in logging.yaml you would define the following format object:

formats:
- name: squid
  format: '%<cqtq> %<ttms> %<chi> %<crc>/%<pssc> %<psql> %<cqhm> %<cquc> %<caun> %<phr>/%<shn> %<psct>'

Hourly Rotated Squid Proxy Logs

The following example demonstrates the creation of a Squid-compatible log format, which is then applied to a log object containing an hourly rotation policy.

formats:
- name: squid
  format: '%<cqtq> %<ttms> %<chi> %<crc>/%<pssc> %<psql> %<cqhm> %<cquc> %<caun> %<phr>/%<shn> %<psct>'

logs:
- mode: ascii
  format: squid
  filename: squid
  rolling_enabled: time
  rolling_interval_sec: 3600
  rolling_offset_hr: 0

Summarizing Number of Requests and Total Bytes Sent Every 10 Seconds

The following example format generates one entry every 10 seconds. Each entry contains the timestamp of the last entry of the interval, a count of the number of entries seen within that 10-second interval, and the sum of all bytes sent to clients:

formats:
- name: mysummary
  format: '%<LAST(cqts)> : %<COUNT(*)> : %<SUM(psql)>'
  interval: 10

Dual Output to Compact Binary Logs and ASCII Pipes

This example demonstrates logging the same event data to multiple locations, in a hypothetical scenario where we may wish to keep a compact form of our logs available for archival purposes, while performing live log analysis on a stream of the event data.

ourformat = format {
  Format = '%<chi> - %<caun> [%<cqtn>] "%<cqtx>" %<pssc> %<pscl>'
}

log.binary {
  Format = ourformat,
  Filename = 'archived_events'
}
log.pipe {
  Format = ourformat,
  Filename = 'streaming_log'
}

Filtering Events to ASCII Pipe for Alerting

This example illustrates a situation in which our Traffic Server cache contains canary objects, which upon their access we want an external alerting system to fire off all sorts of alarms. To accomplish this, we demonstrate the use of a filter object that matches events against these particular canaries and emits log data for them to a UNIX pipe that the alerting software can constantly read from.

formats:
- name: canaryformat
  format: '%<chi> - %<caun> [%<cqtn>] "%<cqtx>" %<pssc> %<pscl>'

filters:
- name: canaryfilter
  accept: cqup MATCH "/nightmare/scenario/dont/touch"

logs:
- mode: pipe
  format: canaryformat
  filters:
  - canaryfilter
  filename: alerting_canaries

Summarizing Origin Responses by Hour

This example demonstrates a simple use of aggregation operators to produce an hourly event line reporting on the total number of requests made to origin servers (where we assume that any cache result code without the string HIT in it signals origin access), as well as the average time it took to fulfill the request to clients during that hour.

formats:
- name: originrepformat
  format: '%<FIRST(cqtq)> %<COUNT(*)> %<AVERAGE(ttms)>'
  interval: 3600

filters:
- name: originfilter
  reject: crc CONTAINS "HIT"

logs:
- mode: ascii
  format: originrepformat
  filters:
  - originfilter
  filename: origin_access_summary